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EXPLORING SPACE - FOR ALL MANKIND-----------------------------------------This blog is to proliferate space travel and exploration to people the world over, in an attempt to inspire a sense of awe and wonder into mankind's greatest accomplishment - the exploration of the stars.---Former NASA History Facebook and Twitter content creator.----------------------Passionate about spaceflight since the age of two, I live and breath rockets, NASA, and anything space. I also enjoy Florida History and World's Fairs. I'm an avid explorer, and I'll occasionally post images from my travels.--------------21 - DC/VA/FL

With the first flight of the Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle slated for launch slightly more than two months from now, the two major components for Exploration Flight Test 1 passed major milestones this week.

The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Module was moved from the Payload Hazardous Processing Facility to the Launch Abort System Facility yesterday (September 28), where it will be mated to its protective launch shroud and abort system. The second image shows the spacecraft shortly after leaving the PHPF.

A few days go, the first and second stages of the Delta IV heavy rocket were mated in the Horizontal Integration Facility at Launch Complex 37. The first image shows the second stage of the Delta launch vehicle shortly before mating to the core stage of the booster in the HIF.

Rollout of the Delta IV vehicle was supposed to be this week, but weather is delaying the process into the first full week of October. Orion is slated to join the vehicle on the pad sometime in early November for integration checks and final testing. If all goes according to schedule, launch will occur at 7:05 AM, December 4.

More information regarding the Delta IV booster integration here.

Reblogged from lightthiscandle  223 notes
from-the-earth-to-the-moon13:

Apollo 16 Command Module after Splashdown in April 1972

A different perspective on a spaceship returning to Earth: Apollo 16 upside down in the water.
Usually, most splash-down shots show the capsule bobbing on the water, surrounded by its flotation collar. However, the capsules often became inverted once hitting the water, posing a danger to vehicle and crew.
Shortly after jettisoning the parachutes, three air bags would deploy at the top of the capsule, righting it in the water until the collar could be attached by rescue divers. 

from-the-earth-to-the-moon13:

Apollo 16 Command Module after Splashdown in April 1972

A different perspective on a spaceship returning to Earth: Apollo 16 upside down in the water.

Usually, most splash-down shots show the capsule bobbing on the water, surrounded by its flotation collar. However, the capsules often became inverted once hitting the water, posing a danger to vehicle and crew.

Shortly after jettisoning the parachutes, three air bags would deploy at the top of the capsule, righting it in the water until the collar could be attached by rescue divers. 

The Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft that launched about two hours ago has had a malfunction.

It’s nothing serious, just a stuck solar array. Normally, this would pose a problem for the vehicle and crew, as the Soyuz took two and a half days to reach the outpost. However, new procedures have enabled same-day rendezvous for almost every mission the last two years.

The spacecraft has more than enough energy stored in batteries to reach the station. The situation will make for some interesting pictures later tonight once it gets within visual and photographic range.

I wonder how this will affect the vehicle’s capability to return the crew five months from now? I believe the spacecraft is turned off while hooked up to station umbilicals, so there probably won’t be any adverse affect down the line.

Expedition 41 launches to the International Space Station today! The three-member crew blasts off at 4:25 PM EST from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. This flight also marks the first time a female cosmonaut has been assigned a tour of duty on the orbiting outpost since habitation began in 2000. Numerous female American astronauts have been assigned, even commanded, the ISS, but Elena Serova is the first from Russia. Six hours after launch, at around 10:15 PM EST, the Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft is scheduled to dock to the station.The three-man spacecraft brings the final members of Expedition 41, which officially on September 10 when the final members of Expedition 40 returned to Earth.Watch it live here.The image above is a view of the Soyuz launch vehicle that will carry the crew to orbit.

Expedition 41 launches to the International Space Station today! The three-member crew blasts off at 4:25 PM EST from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. This flight also marks the first time a female cosmonaut has been assigned a tour of duty on the orbiting outpost since habitation began in 2000. Numerous female American astronauts have been assigned, even commanded, the ISS, but Elena Serova is the first from Russia. Six hours after launch, at around 10:15 PM EST, the Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft is scheduled to dock to the station.

The three-man spacecraft brings the final members of Expedition 41, which officially on September 10 when the final members of Expedition 40 returned to Earth.

Watch it live here.

The image above is a view of the Soyuz launch vehicle that will carry the crew to orbit.

Behold! The first pictures of Mars taken by India’s MOM spacecraft. The probe entered Martian orbit late Tuesday night Eastern time after a ten-month journey to the red planet. The first photo shows the curvature of the planet taken by MOM’s Mars Color Camera from an altitude of 8,448 kilometres. The second shows surface detail and craters and was taken from an altitude of 7,300 kilometres. Both images were originally posted to ISRO’s Facebook page.

Reblogged from astronautfilm  220 notes

sagansense:

Congratulations to the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) for successful insertion of their spacecraft into Mars’ orbit!!!

So proud of this entire team. India and the ISRO have just made history as the first - before China and Japan, who have both failed in their attempts - to join the ESA and Soviet Union regarding a successful spacecraft rendezvous with the red planet. This is huge.

imageimageimage

India joins the U.S., the European Space Agency and the former Soviet Union in the elite club of Martian explorers. China and Japan have so far failed to accomplish this. India is the first country to achieve this on its first attempt. It is also the first Asian country to reach Mars successfully.
Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO)

imageLearn more about the Mars Orbiter Mission (and the scientific achievements/firsts to come)…

I think the coolest thing about this mission (or, a sign of the economy) that the MOM mission was cheaper - per kilometre - than one of India’s autowallahs. The average fare for the taxi is about 15 INR per kilometre, while MOM cost about 11.25 INR per kilometre. Of course, it had farther to go, but it’s still a cool comparison.

One of the members o the Space Hipsters facebook community posted a great little diagram explaining the logic behind this claim. 

Reblogged from thestarvoyager  209 notes
thestarvoyager:

spaceexp:

I made a comparison of some orbital vehicles

Thank you, from the bottom of my heart, for making this.  Nothing puts things in perspective (pardon the pun) like seeing everything lined up and to scale like this.

I love this, however, I wouldn’t add the HTV-R, ISRO Orbital Vehicle, or PTK NP. They haven’t been built yet, and range from concept to partially-funded. You may wonder, then, why I wouldn’t suggest taking the LOK Soyuz off of here. It was built and flown (even if each flight ended in an explosion.

thestarvoyager:

spaceexp:

I made a comparison of some orbital vehicles

Thank you, from the bottom of my heart, for making this.  Nothing puts things in perspective (pardon the pun) like seeing everything lined up and to scale like this.

I love this, however, I wouldn’t add the HTV-R, ISRO Orbital Vehicle, or PTK NP. They haven’t been built yet, and range from concept to partially-funded. You may wonder, then, why I wouldn’t suggest taking the LOK Soyuz off of here. It was built and flown (even if each flight ended in an explosion.

Reblogged from astronautfilm  197 notes

pennyfornasa:

WATCH LIVE: NASA’s TV coverage of MAVEN’s arrival at Mars http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

NASA’s latest Mars mission will arrive at the Red Planet this Sunday after traveling 442 million miles during its 10-month journey. The spacecraft will study Mars from orbit in the hopes of answering the question: If Mars once had an atmosphere capable of sustaining liquid water at its surface, what happened to it?

The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution spacecraft, or MAVEN for short, is NASA’s latest mission to study the Red Planet. It’s the first spacecraft sent specifically to study Mars’ upper atmosphere. It’s job is to examine the composition, structure and escape of gases in the upper atmosphere of Mars, and to study how it interacts with the solar wind.

“So far, so good with the performance of the spacecraft and payloads on the cruise to Mars,” according to MAVEN project manager David Mitchell, of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “The team, the flight system, and all ground assets are ready for Mars orbit insertion.”

The spacecraft is expected to begin orbital insertion at approximately 9:50 p.m. EDT Sunday, when it will fire its engines for 33 minutes to maneuver the spacecraft into a 35-hour elliptical orbit around Mars. The spacecraft will later be moved into a 4.5-hour science orbit.

MAVEN will then embark on a one year prime mission with the aim of improving our understanding of what happened to the Martian atmosphere and the water that was once present on the surface of Mars. “These are important questions for understanding the history of Mars, its climate, and its potential to support at least microbial life,” said MAVEN principal investigator Bruce Jakosky, of the University of Colorado, Boulder’s Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics.

Read more about NASA’s latest mission to the Red Planet here.
http://www.penny4nasa.org/2014/09/19/nasas-maven-spacecraft-arrives-at-mars/

In addition to MAVEN, India’s MOM spacecraft arrives late tomorrow night!