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EXPLORING SPACE - FOR ALL MANKIND
-----------------------------------------This blog is to proliferate space travel and exploration to people the world over, in an attempt to inspire a sense of awe and wonder into mankind's greatest accomplishment - the exploration of the stars.---Currently at NASA HQ in Washington DC. I write the NASA History Facebook and Twitter posts.
----------------------Passionate about spaceflight since the age of two, I live and breath rockets, NASA, and anything space. I also enjoy Florida History and World's Fairs. I'm an avid explorer, and I'll occasionally post images from my travels.--------------
21 - DC/VA/FL
Reblogged from for-all-mankind  85 notes
for-all-mankind:

oldflorida:

The Pan American terminal in Miami.
(via Jassy-50 on Flickr).

This….this needs to exist still. It’s be wonderful.(Actually, I believe that globe is in HistoryMiami; I thought I remembered seeing it when I lived on that side of the state for School.) 

It’s funny to see that I reblogged this postcard so long ago, because last week at the Floridiana Bazaar, I bought this exact postcard. Upon doing more research, that globe is indeed located in a museum, though it’s the Miami Science Museum.
As was common back in the day, postcards would be painted from real-life photos that were taken, and the original image for the above postcard is below.

As one of the terminal’s defining features, the globe was promoted heavily by the airline, and came to be one of the lasting symbols of the company. As seen in this pamphlet, the globe was oriented to the north star so that, when Miami reached the top on its two-minute rotation, the observer could orient himself with the rest of the world.

As stated, the globe is located in lobby of the Miami Science Museum, having been moved there in 1960.
I’ll make a post soon about the Pan Am terminal building in which the globe was housed. Pretty cool little history for a cool post card, don’t you think?

for-all-mankind:

oldflorida:

The Pan American terminal in Miami.

(via Jassy-50 on Flickr).

This….this needs to exist still. It’s be wonderful.
(Actually, I believe that globe is in HistoryMiami; I thought I remembered seeing it when I lived on that side of the state for School.) 

It’s funny to see that I reblogged this postcard so long ago, because last week at the Floridiana Bazaar, I bought this exact postcard. Upon doing more research, that globe is indeed located in a museum, though it’s the Miami Science Museum.


As was common back in the day, postcards would be painted from real-life photos that were taken, and the original image for the above postcard is below.

As one of the terminal’s defining features, the globe was promoted heavily by the airline, and came to be one of the lasting symbols of the company. As seen in this pamphlet, the globe was oriented to the north star so that, when Miami reached the top on its two-minute rotation, the observer could orient himself with the rest of the world.

As stated, the globe is located in lobby of the Miami Science Museum, having been moved there in 1960.

I’ll make a post soon about the Pan Am terminal building in which the globe was housed. Pretty cool little history for a cool post card, don’t you think?

Reblogged from paraparaparadigm  13 notes

Last Friday night, I attended the Floridiana Bazaar at the St Petersburg Shuffleboard Club. The event was held in conjunction with the 2014 annual conference for the Society of Commercial Archaeology, and was  open to the public as well as conference attendees.

Every Friday night, the Shuffleboard Club hosts the St Pete Shuffle, a College/public night for the usually members-only club. Visitors get to play shuffleboard free of cost at the historic facility, and have the opportunity to tailgate. 

There were so many interesting items at the Bazaar, from postcards to old St Petersburg city guides. It was like visiting a Florida-only antique store. Of course, Tumblr’s leading Florida historian, Rick Kilby, organized the Bazaar event, and displayed his book about the Fountain of Youth.

Reblogged from wellummerr  11,268 notes

huffingtonpost:

Everything you need to know about checking the four upcoming lunar eclipses here. 

Just in case some of you guys were curious what the different types of Lunar eclipses were, here’s a neat little gif-tastic diagram of the three types. Also handy is a calendar for the next ones, although the majority of America won’t be able to see a full total eclipse again until 2017.

The first of four eclipses in a series, the Lunar Saros 122. A saros is a fancy way of determining patters in relation to time relating to Earth-Moon solar geometry, so I present to you a Wikipedia article on the topic. For this eclipse cycle, though, their are no intervening partial eclipses of the Moon.

Reblogged from breakingnews  193 notes
breakingnews:

Computer outage at space station may force spacewalk
AP: A computer outage at the International Space Station may require astronauts to complete a spacewalk and delay next week’s launch of a supply ship next week.
A backup computer on the outside of the station is not responding to commands, NASA said Friday. While the main computer is working fine, both computers are needed for a cargo ship to bring nearly 5,000 pounds of supplies next week. 
Mission Control is working to determine whether the computer must be replaced, which would force a spacewalk by one of the station’s six astronauts. 
Photo: This May 23, 2011 photo released by NASA shows the International Space Station at an altitude of approximately 220 miles above the Earth, taken by Expedition 27 crew member Paolo Nespoli from the Soyuz TMA-20 following its undocking. (AP Photo/NASA, Paolo Nespoli)

The computer is a “black box” of sorta for the Remote Manipulator System, or robotic arm. Though not vital to crew support, it is essential to all visiting vehicles required to berth, such as next week’s SpaceX Dragon.

breakingnews:

Computer outage at space station may force spacewalk

AP: A computer outage at the International Space Station may require astronauts to complete a spacewalk and delay next week’s launch of a supply ship next week.

A backup computer on the outside of the station is not responding to commands, NASA said Friday. While the main computer is working fine, both computers are needed for a cargo ship to bring nearly 5,000 pounds of supplies next week. 

Mission Control is working to determine whether the computer must be replaced, which would force a spacewalk by one of the station’s six astronauts. 

Photo: This May 23, 2011 photo released by NASA shows the International Space Station at an altitude of approximately 220 miles above the Earth, taken by Expedition 27 crew member Paolo Nespoli from the Soyuz TMA-20 following its undocking. (AP Photo/NASA, Paolo Nespoli)

The computer is a “black box” of sorta for the Remote Manipulator System, or robotic arm. Though not vital to crew support, it is essential to all visiting vehicles required to berth, such as next week’s SpaceX Dragon.

Reblogged from fuckyeahspaceship  635 notes

martinlkennedy:

I love cutaway tech illustrations. As a kid I’d spend hours looking at them, like a kind of Where’s Wally for geeks. These are from the Hamlyn Encyclopedia of Space, 1981.

I did this all the time myself growing up. I still will, from time to time, but the drawings themselves are far more complex. I think it’s partly why I am so fascinated with spacecraft technology and design.
Reblogged from crookedindifference  413 notes
mapsontheweb:

Map of spaceports with achieved satellite launches.
Source: afrofagne (reddit)



This is an incredible map! It should be noted, however, that there are still many launch sites missing. It’s hard to pinpoint why exactly they aren’t included, because some extremely small or short-lived ones are on here. White Sands Missile Range, the San Marco platform, and a few others are missing. However, this is a nice, quick visual of which spaceports are the busiest in relation to others.

mapsontheweb:

Map of spaceports with achieved satellite launches.

Source: afrofagne (reddit)

This is an incredible map! It should be noted, however, that there are still many launch sites missing. It’s hard to pinpoint why exactly they aren’t included, because some extremely small or short-lived ones are on here. White Sands Missile Range, the San Marco platform, and a few others are missing. However, this is a nice, quick visual of which spaceports are the busiest in relation to others.