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EXPLORING SPACE - FOR ALL MANKIND-----------------------------------------This blog is to proliferate space travel and exploration to people the world over, in an attempt to inspire a sense of awe and wonder into mankind's greatest accomplishment - the exploration of the stars.---Former NASA History Facebook and Twitter content creator.----------------------Passionate about spaceflight since the age of two, I live and breath rockets, NASA, and anything space. I also enjoy Florida History and World's Fairs. I'm an avid explorer, and I'll occasionally post images from my travels.--------------21 - DC/VA/FL

Of the hundreds of times I have seen the Saturn V rocket, at all the locations it is on display in the world, never has it ever been as beautiful or commanding as it was this time.

The five J-2 engines on the second stage attracted my eye the most. The countless wires, chambers, and fuel pumps of the engines contrasted with lack of aerodynamic protection gave the business end of the S-II a mechanical sense that I have never really appreciated before. Sure, the five F-1 engines on the S-IC or the single J-2 on the S-IVB are equally as complex and exposed, but for some reason, the cluster of them on the second stage is appealing.

A surprising lack of people in the building gave me great opportunities for pictures I normally avoid taking due to crowds, and I was able to see the rocket in a totally different perspective.

One of my favorite parts of any space center, a rocket garden provides a peaceful setting to observe and inspect the flight hardware that mankind has used in its quest to conquer the stars. Kennedy Space Center’s rocket garden was the best I have ever seen it when I visited yesterday, 23 July, 2014.

Since I last visited, every rocket has been repainted. The bright red colors of the vehicle markings on the Saturn IB stood out to the most to me. One of my favorite rockets, I remember the IB at Kennedy Space Center severely deteriorated, paint faded and metal rusted. Not the case anymore.

The relatively recently refurbished Gemini Titan II has as it’s most defining feature it’s single LR-87 engine. Since the engine compartment faring was omitted on the Titan missile, the engines and nozzles are exposed more than on other rockets. This allows for great inspection of its complicated system of tubes, pipes, and wires.

One element of the garden I was not able to capture recently are the rockets illuminated at night. The Saturn IB is draped in a dark blue, with each vertical rocket different illuminations of white. Ground lighting adds another level of beautiful ambiance to the garden, which takes on a totally different atmosphere after dark.

Reblogged from jtotheizzoe  2,805 notes

jtotheizzoe:

Forty-five years ago today, two human beings first set foot on the moon. On July 20, 1969, the lunar module of Apollo 11 touched down in the Sea of Tranquility, and forever changed how we view our place in the universe. When I think about the fact that four and a half decades ago, at the very moment I am writing this, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were walking on the freakin’ moon, I am humbled and inspired.

I’ve combined some of my favorite photos from Apollo 11 with some of the actual words spoken by Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins.

If you’d like to relive the historic mission moment by moment, word by word, and photo by photo, head over to SpaceLog

A Foton M4 space capsule launches on a Soyuz 2-1a rocket at 2:50 am local time, Saturday, 19 July, 2014. The capsule carries animals and other experiments to study the affects of microgravity. At the end of its two month mission, it shall return to Earth.

Similar in design to the Bion series of biological experiment satellites, the Foton series use recently capsules near the design of the original Soviet Vostok capsules.

Reblogged from pennyfornasa  37 notes
pennyfornasa:

Winner of the 2013 Webby Award in the ‘Science’ category, the ‘First Men On The Moon' interactive provides viewers with a seamless resource through which to experience (or re-experience) the Apollo 11 moon landing. A synchronized and integrated audio-visual experience, the educational project includes original Apollo 11 spaceflight video footage, communication audio, mission control room conversations, text transcripts, and telemetry data. The result? A moment in history captured so that generations may relive the events that took place on the Moon 45 years ago. Watch, listen, and relive the excitement of the Apollo 11 lunar landing as experienced minute-by-minute by the courageous crew of Apollo 11 and Mission Control: http://goo.gl/39Id3b

Hopefully everyone will be watching this Sunday night!

pennyfornasa:

Winner of the 2013 Webby Award in the ‘Science’ category, the ‘First Men On The Moon' interactive provides viewers with a seamless resource through which to experience (or re-experience) the Apollo 11 moon landing. A synchronized and integrated audio-visual experience, the educational project includes original Apollo 11 spaceflight video footage, communication audio, mission control room conversations, text transcripts, and telemetry data. The result? A moment in history captured so that generations may relive the events that took place on the Moon 45 years ago. 

Watch, listen, and relive the excitement of the Apollo 11 lunar landing as experienced minute-by-minute by the courageous crew of Apollo 11 and Mission Control: http://goo.gl/39Id3b

Hopefully everyone will be watching this Sunday night!