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EXPLORING SPACE - FOR ALL MANKIND-----------------------------------------This blog is to proliferate space travel and exploration to people the world over, in an attempt to inspire a sense of awe and wonder into mankind's greatest accomplishment - the exploration of the stars.---Former NASA History Facebook and Twitter content creator.----------------------Passionate about spaceflight since the age of two, I live and breath rockets, NASA, and anything space. I also enjoy Florida History and World's Fairs. I'm an avid explorer, and I'll occasionally post images from my travels.--------------21 - DC/VA/FL

Reblogged from pennyfornasa  37 notes
pennyfornasa:

Winner of the 2013 Webby Award in the ‘Science’ category, the ‘First Men On The Moon' interactive provides viewers with a seamless resource through which to experience (or re-experience) the Apollo 11 moon landing. A synchronized and integrated audio-visual experience, the educational project includes original Apollo 11 spaceflight video footage, communication audio, mission control room conversations, text transcripts, and telemetry data. The result? A moment in history captured so that generations may relive the events that took place on the Moon 45 years ago. Watch, listen, and relive the excitement of the Apollo 11 lunar landing as experienced minute-by-minute by the courageous crew of Apollo 11 and Mission Control: http://goo.gl/39Id3b

Hopefully everyone will be watching this Sunday night!

pennyfornasa:

Winner of the 2013 Webby Award in the ‘Science’ category, the ‘First Men On The Moon' interactive provides viewers with a seamless resource through which to experience (or re-experience) the Apollo 11 moon landing. A synchronized and integrated audio-visual experience, the educational project includes original Apollo 11 spaceflight video footage, communication audio, mission control room conversations, text transcripts, and telemetry data. The result? A moment in history captured so that generations may relive the events that took place on the Moon 45 years ago. 

Watch, listen, and relive the excitement of the Apollo 11 lunar landing as experienced minute-by-minute by the courageous crew of Apollo 11 and Mission Control: http://goo.gl/39Id3b

Hopefully everyone will be watching this Sunday night!

Reblogged from kevindart  809 notes

kevindart:

Collector’s Space Shuttle Screenprints!

I’ll be debuting 3 new screenprints at Comic Con next week commemorating the amazing Space Shuttle program which spanned 30 years! These will be available indivudually for $75 or as a set for $200. Each one is 10”x28”.

Come visit me and my friends Jasmin Lai and Tiffany Ford at Booth #5007!

These are incredible designs. I’d love to see them as a wall banner (maybe that’s what a screen print is?) hanging from my bookshelves, or even the space center.

Reblogged from todaysdocument  2,204 notes
todaysdocument:

A Saturn V rocket launches from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on July 16, 1969, carrying the crew of Apollo 11 on their historic mission to the surface of the Moon.

The Eagle Has Landed,The Flight of Apollo 11, 1969
From the series: Headquarters’ Films Relating to Aeronautics, compiled 1962 - 1981. Record Group 255: Records of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1903 - 2006


The majesty that is the Saturn V launching.

todaysdocument:

A Saturn V rocket launches from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on July 16, 1969, carrying the crew of Apollo 11 on their historic mission to the surface of the Moon.

The Eagle Has Landed,The Flight of Apollo 11, 1969

From the series: Headquarters’ Films Relating to Aeronautics, compiled 1962 - 1981. Record Group 255: Records of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1903 - 2006

The majesty that is the Saturn V launching.

Reblogged from newsweek  2,231 notes
newsweek:

NASA 360: 
45 years ago Neil Armstrong took that small step onto the surface of our moon forever changing the course of history. Now, NASA is on a new Path to Mars. 
In fact, the first humans who will step foot on Mars are already walking the Earth today.



Forty-five years ago tomorrow, mankind embarked on a journey that forever changed the course of Human history. It solidified our dreams to explore the stars, and engrained curiosity, discovery and exploration into the minds of all those who learn about it. 


The Apollo missions proved to the world what our species was capable of, and the International Space Station proved that nations could come together and cooperate to accomplish a goal. It’s time to combine the two and set our minds towards a new goal, a new dream, that the people today can accomplish.

newsweek:

NASA 360: 

45 years ago Neil Armstrong took that small step onto the surface of our moon forever changing the course of history. Now, NASA is on a new Path to Mars. 


In fact, the first humans who will step foot on Mars are already walking the Earth today.

Forty-five years ago tomorrow, mankind embarked on a journey that forever changed the course of Human history. It solidified our dreams to explore the stars, and engrained curiosity, discovery and exploration into the minds of all those who learn about it. The Apollo missions proved to the world what our species was capable of, and the International Space Station proved that nations could come together and cooperate to accomplish a goal. It’s time to combine the two and set our minds towards a new goal, a new dream, that the people today can accomplish.
Reblogged from fuckyeahspaceshuttle  785 notes

An orbital sunrise brightens this view of space shuttle Discovery’s vertical stabilizer, orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods, docking mechanism, remote manipulator system/orbiter boom sensor system (RMS/OBSS) and payload bay photographed by an STS-133 crew member on the shuttle during flight day 12 activities.
(link)


This picture looks surreal. It’s beautiful.

An orbital sunrise brightens this view of space shuttle Discovery’s vertical stabilizer, orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods, docking mechanism, remote manipulator system/orbiter boom sensor system (RMS/OBSS) and payload bay photographed by an STS-133 crew member on the shuttle during flight day 12 activities.

(link)

This picture looks surreal. It’s beautiful.

Reblogged from fuckyeahspaceship  128 notes

martinlkennedy:

A spectacular British space shuttle proposal from the late 1960s. From the book Frontiers of Space (1969)

Ahh, mustard. The hilariously named yet somewhat practical design for a space shuttle. The smithsonian has the official model at the Udvar-Hazy center.

Today’s launch was beautiful.

The Antares launch will always hold a special place in my heart. It was the last launch I saw in person, the last one I saw before moving away from DC, and the closest I’ve ever been to an active, launching vehicle.

To make today’s launch even better, while listening to the launch broadcast, the announcer’s voice almost got lost in the sound of cheering spectators. Screaming, shouting, pure exhilaration. Nothing makes me emotional faster than people displaying pure excitement over a rocket launch. It was a beautiful sound to hear, and remind me that all is not lost in Spaceflight awareness. People do care. People love seeing things launch into space. People find it important. I’m not the only one who is this crazy for it.