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EXPLORING SPACE - FOR ALL MANKIND-----------------------------------------This blog is to proliferate space travel and exploration to people the world over, in an attempt to inspire a sense of awe and wonder into mankind's greatest accomplishment - the exploration of the stars.---Former NASA History Facebook and Twitter content creator.----------------------Passionate about spaceflight since the age of two, I live and breath rockets, NASA, and anything space. I also enjoy Florida History and World's Fairs. I'm an avid explorer, and I'll occasionally post images from my travels.--------------21 - DC/VA/FL

Reblogged from txchnologist  476 notes

txchnologist:

Next-Generation Space Capsule To Endure First Flight Test

On Dec. 4, NASA will launch the Orion capsule on its first space flight aboard the Delta IV Heavy rocket. The vehicle, which is expected to one day carry astronauts to an asteroid and Mars, will perform its first mission unmanned. It is being loaded up with radiation, heat and acceleration sensors, among numerous other instruments, to perform a fact-finding test flight for future exploration.

The four-and-a-half-hour trip will make two orbits around Earth and also test safety systems that will be critical to keeping astronauts alive and comfortable. Orion will go as far as 3,600 miles above Earth to pass through the Van Allen Belt, an area of high radiation levels, to test shielding designed to protect humans from harmful charged particles as they venture deeper into space.

See the full video below.

Read More

The video gives a really good insight into the flight plan and goals of EFT-1. 

Reblogged from 1auaway  704 notes
humanoidhistory:

Light scattered by the Earth’s atmosphere as our home world eclipses the Sun.
(NASA)

Actually, if you read the description, this is an animation of what the Earth would look like during a Lunar Eclipse from the perspective of the Moon. While not an image, it’s still petty cool to see what it more or less looks like.
 

Is everyone ready or the eclipse early tomorrow morning?! Check out this website or more information and a map to see if you’ll be in a good area to see it. Here on the eastern coast of the states, we’ll only be able to see it or an hour or so right at moonset.

humanoidhistory:

Light scattered by the Earth’s atmosphere as our home world eclipses the Sun.

(NASA)

Actually, if you read the description, this is an animation of what the Earth would look like during a Lunar Eclipse from the perspective of the Moon. While not an image, it’s still petty cool to see what it more or less looks like.

 

Is everyone ready or the eclipse early tomorrow morning?! Check out this website or more information and a map to see if you’ll be in a good area to see it. Here on the eastern coast of the states, we’ll only be able to see it or an hour or so right at moonset.

T-61 days

Yesterday, 3 October 2014, the first component of the Launch Abort System was mated to the Orion capsule in the preparation for the EFT-1 Mission. The LAS will be used to rapidly move the crew capsule away from the malfunctioning rocket in the event of a catastrophic anomaly. In EFT-1, the LAS will be used to verify its separation procedures once it is no longer needed. 

Once the LAS had been integrated to the capsule, the entire assembly will be moved to Launch Complex 37 in early November for mating with the Delta IV Heavy launch vehicle. The rocket arrived at the pad last week, marking the start of pad flow operations.

Past and present meet in this interesting perspective on yesterday’s Delta IV Heavy rollout at Complex 37. Matthew Travis of Zero-G news captured this shot from Launch Complex 34. LC-37, like LC-34, was originally built as launch pads for the Saturn 1 rockets in the early 1960’s. Originally deactivated in 1972, the complex was refurbished in 2001 to support launch operations of the United Launch Alliance’s Delta IV family of vehicles.

Past and present meet in this interesting perspective on yesterday’s Delta IV Heavy rollout at Complex 37. Matthew Travis of Zero-G news captured this shot from Launch Complex 34. 

LC-37, like LC-34, was originally built as launch pads for the Saturn 1 rockets in the early 1960’s. Originally deactivated in 1972, the complex was refurbished in 2001 to support launch operations of the United Launch Alliance’s Delta IV family of vehicles.

T-63 days

Earlier this morning (1 October, 2014) the Delta IV Heavy rocket for the Exploration Flight Test 1 mission was erected at Launch Complex 37. The booster has been in assembly at the Horizontal Integration Facility for the last few months. Last week, the rocket’s four major components were mated together, which I covered in this post. Rollout was delayed for a few days due to unfavorable weather at the Cape.

The Orion capsule will be mated to the vehicle once it is mated to the Launch Abort System. Last Sunday (28 September) Orion was moved from the Payload Hazardous Processing Facility, where it was fueled with propellants, to the Launch Abort System Facility for this crucial step. the spacecraft will roll out to Complex 37 near the end of this month for mating to the Delta IV, beginning integrated preflight testing. If all milestones are met without significant error, launch will take place at 7:05 AM EST, December 4th.

Images courtesy of NASA’s Kennedy Space Center.

With the first flight of the Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle slated for launch slightly more than two months from now, the two major components for Exploration Flight Test 1 passed major milestones this week.

Orion was moved from the Payload Hazardous Processing Facility to the Launch Abort System Facility yesterday (September 28), where it will be mated to its protective launch shroud and abort system. The second image shows the spacecraft shortly after leaving the PHPF.

A few days go, the first and second stages of the Delta IV heavy rocket were mated in the Horizontal Integration Facility at Launch Complex 37. The first image shows the second stage of the Delta launch vehicle shortly before mating to the core stage of the booster in the HIF.

Rollout of the Delta IV vehicle was supposed to be this week, but weather is delaying the process into the first full week of October. Orion is slated to join the vehicle on the pad sometime in early November for integration checks and final testing. If all goes according to schedule, launch will occur at 7:05 AM, December 4.

More information regarding the Delta IV booster integration here.

Reblogged from lightthiscandle  250 notes
from-the-earth-to-the-moon13:

Apollo 16 Command Module after Splashdown in April 1972

A different perspective on a spaceship returning to Earth: Apollo 16 upside down in the water.
Usually, most splash-down shots show the capsule bobbing on the water, surrounded by its flotation collar. However, the capsules often became inverted once hitting the water, posing a danger to vehicle and crew.
Shortly after jettisoning the parachutes, three air bags would deploy at the top of the capsule, righting it in the water until the collar could be attached by rescue divers. 

from-the-earth-to-the-moon13:

Apollo 16 Command Module after Splashdown in April 1972

A different perspective on a spaceship returning to Earth: Apollo 16 upside down in the water.

Usually, most splash-down shots show the capsule bobbing on the water, surrounded by its flotation collar. However, the capsules often became inverted once hitting the water, posing a danger to vehicle and crew.

Shortly after jettisoning the parachutes, three air bags would deploy at the top of the capsule, righting it in the water until the collar could be attached by rescue divers. 

The Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft that launched about two hours ago has had a malfunction.

It’s nothing serious, just a stuck solar array. Normally, this would pose a problem for the vehicle and crew, as the Soyuz took two and a half days to reach the outpost. However, new procedures have enabled same-day rendezvous for almost every mission the last two years.

The spacecraft has more than enough energy stored in batteries to reach the station. The situation will make for some interesting pictures later tonight once it gets within visual and photographic range.

I wonder how this will affect the vehicle’s capability to return the crew five months from now? I believe the spacecraft is turned off while hooked up to station umbilicals, so there probably won’t be any adverse affect down the line.