Instagram

EXPLORING SPACE - FOR ALL MANKIND-----------------------------------------This blog is to proliferate space travel and exploration to people the world over, in an attempt to inspire a sense of awe and wonder into mankind's greatest accomplishment - the exploration of the stars.---Former NASA History Facebook and Twitter content creator.----------------------Passionate about spaceflight since the age of two, I live and breath rockets, NASA, and anything space. I also enjoy Florida History and World's Fairs. I'm an avid explorer, and I'll occasionally post images from my travels.--------------21 - DC/VA/FL

Reblogged from explorationimages  31 notes

explorationimages:

"The Venus Pioneers" - Circa-1978 NASA film about the two Pioneer Venus missions. These probes are largely forgotten today, but they made a big impact on me as a kid. The Pioneer Venus Orbiter made the first, fairly low resolution radar map of the planet’s surface, which was compiled over the course of the first year or so in orbit. One of the monthly magazines, I forget whether it was Sky and Telescope or Astronomy, included an updated map in each month’s issue, so I’d go to the library when a new issue came out, and there’d be a new updated map, and a few more of the blank, empty spaces would be filled in, and later names started to appear. I was just a kid, but I knew I was seeing something everybody was seeing for the first time, and I thought that was amazing. I was hooked.

Interesting documentary. It started and ended a little slow, however, a good overview summary of the mission and the spacecraft. The next U.S. mission to Venus would be Magellan, more than 12 years later.

Reblogged from astronautfilm  132 notes

starstuffblog:

NASA Completes Key Review of World’s Most Powerful Rocket in Support of Journey to Mars

NASA officials Wednesday announced they have completed a rigorous review of the Space Launch System (SLS) — the heavy-lift, exploration class rocket under development to take humans beyond Earth orbit and to Mars — and approved the program’s progression from formulation to development, something no other exploration class vehicle has achieved since the agency built the space shuttle.

"We are on a journey of scientific and human exploration that leads to Mars," said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden. "And we’re firmly committed to building the launch vehicle and other supporting systems that will take us on that journey."

For its first flight test, SLS will be configured for a 70-metric-ton (77-ton) lift capacity and carry an uncrewed Orion spacecraft beyond low-Earth orbit. In its most powerful configuration, SLS will provide an unprecedented lift capability of 130 metric tons (143 tons), which will enable missions even farther into our solar system, including such destinations as an asteroid and Mars.

This decision comes after a thorough review known as Key Decision Point C (KDP-C), which provides a development cost baseline for the 70-metric ton version of the SLS of $7.021 billion from February 2014 through the first launch and a launch readiness schedule based on an initial SLS flight no later than November 2018.

Conservative cost and schedule commitments outlined in the KDP-C align the SLS program with program management best practices that account for potential technical risks and budgetary uncertainty beyond the program’s control.

“Our nation is embarked on an ambitious space exploration program, and we owe it to the American taxpayers to get it right,” said Associate Administrator Robert Lightfoot, who oversaw the review process. “After rigorous review, we’re committing today to a funding level and readiness date that will keep us on track to sending humans to Mars in the 2030s – and we’re going to stand behind that commitment.”

"The Space Launch System Program has done exemplary work during the past three years to get us to this point," said William Gerstenmaier, associate administrator for the Human Explorations and Operations Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington. "We will keep the teams working toward a more ambitious readiness date, but will be ready no later than November 2018.”

The SLS, Orion, and Ground Systems Development and Operations programs each conduct a design review prior to each program’s respective KDP-C, and each program will establish cost and schedule commitments that account for its individual technical requirements.

"We are keeping each part of the program — the rocket, ground systems, and Orion — moving at its best possible speed toward the first integrated test launch,” said Bill Hill, director Exploration Systems Development at NASA. "We are on a solid path toward an integrated mission and making progress in all three programs every day."

“Engineers have made significant technical progress on the rocket and have produced hardware for all elements of the SLS program,” said SLS program manager Todd May. “The team members deserve an enormous amount of credit for their dedication to building this national asset.”

The program delivered in April the first piece of flight hardware for Orion’s maiden flight, Exploration Flight Test-1 targeted for December. This stage adapter is of the same design that will be used on SLS’s first flight, Exploration Mission-1.

Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans has all major tools installed and is producing hardware, including the first pieces of flight hardware for SLS. Sixteen RS-25 engines, enough for four flights, currently are in inventory at Stennis Space Center, in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, where an engine is already installed and ready for testing this fall. NASA contractor ATK has conducted successful test firings of the five-segment solid rocket boosters and is preparing for the first qualification motor test.

SLS will be the world’s most capable rocket. In addition to opening new frontiers for explorers traveling aboard the Orion capsule, the SLS may also offer benefits for science missions that require its use and can’t be flown on commercial rockets.

The next phase of development for SLS is the Critical Design Review, a programmatic gate that reaffirms the agency’s confidence in the program planning and technical risk posture.

TOP IMAGE….Artist concept of NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) 70-metric-ton configuration launching to space. SLS will be the most powerful rocket ever built for deep space missions, including to an asteroid and ultimately to Mars. Image Credit: NASA/MSFC

LOWER IMAGE…This artist concept shows NASA’s Space Launch System, or SLS, rolling to a launchpad at Kennedy Space Center at night. SLS will be the most powerful rocket in history, and the flexible, evolvable design of this advanced, heavy-lift launch vehicle will meet a variety of crew and cargo mission needs. Image Credit: NASA/MSFC

That’s a beautiful night rendering of rollout.

Reblogged from fuckyeahspaceship  648 notes

martinlkennedy:

Select illustrations from The Rocket (A Ladybird ‘How It Works’ Book). I missed out on Ladybird Books when I was a kid thus my current obsession collecting them.

A Ladybird ‘How It Works’ Book: The Rocket, series ‘654.’ Originally published in1967. Illustrated by B.H. Robinson.

Featuring a modified two-engine Navajo-type missile, Manned Orbiting Laboratory, Lunar Gemini, and Telstar 1!

Newspapers can tell you a lot about history. It offers a first-hand perspective on the events, thoughts, view points and experiences of the past in ways far better than what any history textbook or secondary source could offer. It is for this reason that historians refer to periodicals and newspapers as primary sources, as opposed to secondary sources, such as textbooks, newspapers, and books.

While scouring Google News’ archives for information relating to a different project, I’ve come across a number of articles referring to space-age events that we in the 21st century are only familiar with via documentary, book, or museum. It’s a humbling reminder of the prevalence the space program had in the daily lives of people in the 1960’s, even down to the most minuscule of happenings. You don’t see that nearly as much today.

Shown above are some of the newspaper articles I’ve come across. The first two, that of Neil Armstrong testing the LC-19 slide wire escape system and “Apollo Moonship Shot is Scheduled Saturday,” came from the 25 February, 1966 edition of the St Petersburg Evening Independent. The Apollo flight mentioned was AS-201, the first flight of an Apollo Command/Service Module on a Saturn vehicle, as well as the initial flight of the Saturn IB vehicle. The suborbital flight validated the vehicle’s structural performance, capsule reentry and landing systems, and Service Module engine restart capabilities.

The “Failing Rocket Won’t Export Gold” article, of 29 January 1965, refers to an XRM-91Blue Scout Junior rocket failure the day before. The payload was a satellite launched by the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory to study different magnetospheric phenomena.


On this day in 1989, 25 years ago, the Voyager 2 mission performed its flyby of Neptune. The probe’s final planetary encounter, Voyager passed within 3,000 miles of the planet’s north pole. During this time, definitive proof of Neptune’s rings were discovered, as well as close photographic observations of the “great dark spot.” This atmospheric disturbance has since disappeared based off of more recent observations by the Hubble Space Telescope, with the prevailing theory that it was merely a hole in the planet’s upper cloud layers. 

Coincidentally, the New Horizons probe crosses Neptune’s orbit today on its way to Pluto. Unlike Voyager, however, New Horizons will not be able to fly by the planet. It is the final planetary milestone the mission passes on its way to a July, 2015 flyby of the planetoid.

Launched in 2006, New Horizons will mark a milestone in humanity’s exploration of the solar system. Once its flyby is complete, every major body in our solar system will have been visited by human machines. It is only the fifth probe ever launched on a trajectory out of the solar system.

For more information on Voyager’s flyby, click here

For an over view of New Horizons, click here. To see where the spacecraft currently is, check out its tracking page here. A

Reblogged from for-all-mankind  109 notes
for-all-mankind:

A SpaceX rocket prototype, used by the company to test its first stage landing technology, exploded during its test flight today. Official reports simply say there was an anomaly, and have yet to disclose an official case.
The prototype rockets are tested at the company’s McGregor, Texas facility.

Reposting because here is a video of the rocket’s flight and subsequent termination. 

for-all-mankind:

A SpaceX rocket prototype, used by the company to test its first stage landing technology, exploded during its test flight today. Official reports simply say there was an anomaly, and have yet to disclose an official case.

The prototype rockets are tested at the company’s McGregor, Texas facility.

Reposting because here is a video of the rocket’s flight and subsequent termination. 

Reblogged from lightthiscandle  74 notes
lightthiscandle:

astronautfashions:

Carol Calhoun of TWA Services poses with the recently erected Apollo CSM checkout vehicle at the KSC Visitors Center. Photo dated December 16, 1971.
Retro Space Images

So. Rad.

I believe this is the same vehicle as the spacecraft I posted about yesterday. I wouldn’t be surprised if, when NASA was done using it, it was transferred over to the Visitor Center. In any cause, it was removed during the major renovation in the 90’s that made the Visitor Information Center, run by TWA, into the paid-admission Visitor Complex run by Delaware North.

lightthiscandle:

astronautfashions:

Carol Calhoun of TWA Services poses with the recently erected Apollo CSM checkout vehicle at the KSC Visitors Center. Photo dated December 16, 1971.

Retro Space Images

So. Rad.

I believe this is the same vehicle as the spacecraft I posted about yesterday. I wouldn’t be surprised if, when NASA was done using it, it was transferred over to the Visitor Center. In any cause, it was removed during the major renovation in the 90’s that made the Visitor Information Center, run by TWA, into the paid-admission Visitor Complex run by Delaware North.