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EXPLORING SPACE - FOR ALL MANKIND
-----------------------------------------This blog is to proliferate space travel and exploration to people the world over, in an attempt to inspire a sense of awe and wonder into mankind's greatest accomplishment - the exploration of the stars.---Currently at NASA HQ in Washington DC. I write the NASA History Facebook and Twitter posts.
----------------------Passionate about spaceflight since the age of two, I live and breath rockets, NASA, and anything space. I also enjoy Florida History and World's Fairs. I'm an avid explorer, and I'll occasionally post images from my travels.--------------
21 - DC/VA/FL
Reblogged from fuckyeahspaceship  658 notes

martinlkennedy:

I love cutaway tech illustrations. As a kid I’d spend hours looking at them, like a kind of Where’s Wally for geeks. These are from the Hamlyn Encyclopedia of Space, 1981.

I did this all the time myself growing up. I still will, from time to time, but the drawings themselves are far more complex. I think it’s partly why I am so fascinated with spacecraft technology and design.
Reblogged from crookedindifference  417 notes
mapsontheweb:

Map of spaceports with achieved satellite launches.
Source: afrofagne (reddit)



This is an incredible map! It should be noted, however, that there are still many launch sites missing. It’s hard to pinpoint why exactly they aren’t included, because some extremely small or short-lived ones are on here. White Sands Missile Range, the San Marco platform, and a few others are missing. However, this is a nice, quick visual of which spaceports are the busiest in relation to others.

mapsontheweb:

Map of spaceports with achieved satellite launches.

Source: afrofagne (reddit)

This is an incredible map! It should be noted, however, that there are still many launch sites missing. It’s hard to pinpoint why exactly they aren’t included, because some extremely small or short-lived ones are on here. White Sands Missile Range, the San Marco platform, and a few others are missing. However, this is a nice, quick visual of which spaceports are the busiest in relation to others.

The Soyuz rocket, which will launch Europe’s Sentinal-1A satellite into orbit, rolls to it’s French Guiana launch pad on 31 March 2014. Launch will occur today at 5:02 PM EST.

The satellite is part of the groundbreaking Copernicus satellite series which will revolutionize the way we view our home planet. It’s the largest such program ever devised by any nation on Earth, and is a joint initiative between the European Space Agency and the European Union’s executive body.

Sentinel-1A and it’s 2015 counterpart, Sentinel-1B, have the capability to see the surface of the planet regardless of weather or solar position.


Click here to see an infographic on the revolutionary satellite series and how each one will operate.

Click here to see the live launch feed!

Reblogged from lightthiscandle  357 notes

humanoidhistory:

Atlas rocket launch, Cape Canaveral, January 10, 1958. Before you blast a rocket into space, there’s the slightly more mundane job of trucking it to the launch pad and pointing it in the right direction. (Siloworld)

Rockets to this day are still erected in much the same way. Here’s a modern-day Atlas V rocket being stacked in preparation for a January, 2013 launch of a TDRS-K communications satellite for NASA.

The core stage is trucked to the pad where it is erected to the vertical and hoisted into place:

Next, the Centaur upper stage is mated to the vehicle in a similar manner:

The satellite payload was mated the same way spacecraft would be to the Mercury-Atlas during the 1960’s - arriving separately and protected.

The primary difference between the first and the second photoset is the multi-component aspect of the vehicle. Whereas the Atlas ICBM’s of the Cold War could be erected in one piece, the Atlas launch vehicles are multi-staged and require stacking.

Reblogged from senior-crown  272 notes
humanoidhistory:

Atlas rocket at Cape Canaveral, September 17, 1959. (Siloworld)

Atlas vehicle 17D prior to launch. The “D” symbolized the variant of the Atlas missile, while 17 was the vehicle’s serial number. The eighth launch of the “D” variant, the suborbital flight was deemed a failure.I’m currently constructing a small model of the similar Mercury-Atlas.

humanoidhistory:

Atlas rocket at Cape Canaveral, September 17, 1959. (Siloworld)

Atlas vehicle 17D prior to launch. The “D” symbolized the variant of the Atlas missile, while 17 was the vehicle’s serial number. The eighth launch of the “D” variant, the suborbital flight was deemed a failure.

I’m currently constructing a small model of the similar Mercury-Atlas.

Reblogged from canadian-space-agency  249 notes
canadian-space-agency:

The crew aboard the ISS had a great view of last Tuesday’s (March 25th 2014) Soyuz launch as seen in this picture taken by NASA Astronaut Rick Mastracchio.
Photo Credit: Rick Mastracchio/NASA

A rising star, from an evening star.I love photos of launches from the space station. Reentry’s make for a beautiful spectacle themselves when they are caught from the orbiting outpost:

canadian-space-agency:

The crew aboard the ISS had a great view of last Tuesday’s (March 25th 2014) Soyuz launch as seen in this picture taken by NASA Astronaut Rick Mastracchio.

Photo Credit: Rick Mastracchio/NASA

A rising star, from an evening star.

I love photos of launches from the space station. Reentry’s make for a beautiful spectacle themselves when they are caught from the orbiting outpost:

While road-tripping throughout central Florida this past Sunday (23 March, 2014), I encountered a unique and totally retro neon starburst sign in the parking lot of a Mercury car dealership.

Doing some research, I found that the Rotosphere, or “Sputnik” sign, was installed in the early 1960’s. Of the 230 manufactured, only a dozen were left standing by 2007, and of those, only three had remained operational.

For more operation on the roto-sphere signs, along with some photos of other surviving signs, visit here.

For an article of when Lakeland’s roto-sphere was reinstalled, go here.

Both photos by me!