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EXPLORING SPACE - FOR ALL MANKIND-----------------------------------------This blog is to proliferate space travel and exploration to people the world over, in an attempt to inspire a sense of awe and wonder into mankind's greatest accomplishment - the exploration of the stars.---Former NASA History Facebook and Twitter content creator.----------------------Passionate about spaceflight since the age of two, I live and breath rockets, NASA, and anything space. I also enjoy Florida History and World's Fairs. I'm an avid explorer, and I'll occasionally post images from my travels.--------------21 - DC/VA/FL

Reblogged from todaysdocument  2,168 notes
todaysdocument:

A Saturn V rocket launches from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on July 16, 1969, carrying the crew of Apollo 11 on their historic mission to the surface of the Moon.

The Eagle Has Landed,The Flight of Apollo 11, 1969
From the series: Headquarters’ Films Relating to Aeronautics, compiled 1962 - 1981. Record Group 255: Records of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1903 - 2006


The majesty that is the Saturn V launching.

todaysdocument:

A Saturn V rocket launches from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on July 16, 1969, carrying the crew of Apollo 11 on their historic mission to the surface of the Moon.

The Eagle Has Landed,The Flight of Apollo 11, 1969

From the series: Headquarters’ Films Relating to Aeronautics, compiled 1962 - 1981. Record Group 255: Records of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1903 - 2006

The majesty that is the Saturn V launching.

Reblogged from newsweek  2,174 notes
newsweek:

NASA 360: 
45 years ago Neil Armstrong took that small step onto the surface of our moon forever changing the course of history. Now, NASA is on a new Path to Mars. 
In fact, the first humans who will step foot on Mars are already walking the Earth today.



Forty-five years ago tomorrow, mankind embarked on a journey that forever changed the course of Human history. It solidified our dreams to explore the stars, and engrained curiosity, discovery and exploration into the minds of all those who learn about it. 


The Apollo missions proved to the world what our species was capable of, and the International Space Station proved that nations could come together and cooperate to accomplish a goal. It’s time to combine the two and set our minds towards a new goal, a new dream, that the people today can accomplish.

newsweek:

NASA 360: 

45 years ago Neil Armstrong took that small step onto the surface of our moon forever changing the course of history. Now, NASA is on a new Path to Mars. 


In fact, the first humans who will step foot on Mars are already walking the Earth today.

Forty-five years ago tomorrow, mankind embarked on a journey that forever changed the course of Human history. It solidified our dreams to explore the stars, and engrained curiosity, discovery and exploration into the minds of all those who learn about it. The Apollo missions proved to the world what our species was capable of, and the International Space Station proved that nations could come together and cooperate to accomplish a goal. It’s time to combine the two and set our minds towards a new goal, a new dream, that the people today can accomplish.
Reblogged from fuckyeahspaceshuttle  715 notes

An orbital sunrise brightens this view of space shuttle Discovery’s vertical stabilizer, orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods, docking mechanism, remote manipulator system/orbiter boom sensor system (RMS/OBSS) and payload bay photographed by an STS-133 crew member on the shuttle during flight day 12 activities.
(link)


This picture looks surreal. It’s beautiful.

An orbital sunrise brightens this view of space shuttle Discovery’s vertical stabilizer, orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods, docking mechanism, remote manipulator system/orbiter boom sensor system (RMS/OBSS) and payload bay photographed by an STS-133 crew member on the shuttle during flight day 12 activities.

(link)

This picture looks surreal. It’s beautiful.

Reblogged from fuckyeahspaceship  126 notes

martinlkennedy:

A spectacular British space shuttle proposal from the late 1960s. From the book Frontiers of Space (1969)

Ahh, mustard. The hilariously named yet somewhat practical design for a space shuttle. The smithsonian has the official model at the Udvar-Hazy center.

Today’s launch was beautiful.

The Antares launch will always hold a special place in my heart. It was the last launch I saw in person, the last one I saw before moving away from DC, and the closest I’ve ever been to an active, launching vehicle.

To make today’s launch even better, while listening to the launch broadcast, the announcer’s voice almost got lost in the sound of cheering spectators. Screaming, shouting, pure exhilaration. Nothing makes me emotional faster than people displaying pure excitement over a rocket launch. It was a beautiful sound to hear, and remind me that all is not lost in Spaceflight awareness. People do care. People love seeing things launch into space. People find it important. I’m not the only one who is this crazy for it.

Marking the start of their second operational resupply mission to the International Space Station, Orbital Sciences successfully launched their Antares rocket this afternoon. Liftoff occurred at 12:52pm from pad 0A at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.

The Cygnus spacecraft on the Orb 2 mission is named after astronaut Janice Voss, who passed away in 2012.

One of two companies contracted to resupply the orbiting outpost, Orbital Sciences is based in Dulles, Virginia, and has significant experience in the aerospace industry. Including building satellites, they also operate the Pegasus and Minotaur launch vehicles.

Reblogged from glenncgallagher  163 notes

Seen flying above part of North Island, New Zealand, the space shuttle Endeavour is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 22 crew member during STS-130 rendezvous and docking operations with the International Space Station. Docking occurred at 11:06 p.m. 
(link)

A similar vantage point from the last photo, but a later mission. I love the contrast between the two vehicles.

Seen flying above part of North Island, New Zealand, the space shuttle Endeavour is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 22 crew member during STS-130 rendezvous and docking operations with the International Space Station. Docking occurred at 11:06 p.m. 

(link)

A similar vantage point from the last photo, but a later mission. I love the contrast between the two vehicles.

Reblogged from fuckyeahspaceshuttle  78 notes

The space shuttle Endeavour is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 22 crew member on the International Space Station soon after the shuttle and station began their post-undocking relative separation. Undocking of the two spacecraft occurred at 7:54 p.m. (EST) on Feb. 19, 2010. Also pictured are the newly-installed Tranquility node and Cupola; along with a Russian Soyuz spacecraft docked with the station. Earth’s horizon and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.
(link)

Two beautiful vehicles.

The space shuttle Endeavour is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 22 crew member on the International Space Station soon after the shuttle and station began their post-undocking relative separation. Undocking of the two spacecraft occurred at 7:54 p.m. (EST) on Feb. 19, 2010. Also pictured are the newly-installed Tranquility node and Cupola; along with a Russian Soyuz spacecraft docked with the station. Earth’s horizon and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.

(link)

Two beautiful vehicles.

An Orbital Sciences Antares rocket was rolled out and erected at its launch pad yesterday, July 9, 2014. The Orb-2 mission will be the company’s second operational resupply mission to the International Space Station with their Cygnus spacecraft, following a September test flight and December inaugural operational mission. Antares launches from pad 02 at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport adjacent to NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on the Virginia shore. 

I covered the September, 2013 Orb-D1 test flight during my time in the NASA Public Affairs office, which I made a few posts about here. A fellow co-worker caught my excitement shortly after launch, and the amusing photo can be viewed here. If you remember the space frog from the LADEE mission, you’ll get a kick out of that image of me.

Additional information from the company’s website about Orb-2 can be found here.

Reblogged from fuckyeahspaceshuttle  73 notes
fuckyeahspaceshuttle:

Atlantis “Floats” Over the Earth

Backdropped by a colorful Earth, space shuttle Atlantis is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 23 crew member as the shuttle approaches the International Space Station during STS-132 rendezvous and docking operations. 
Tenerife in the Canary Island chain is visible below. 
(link)

fuckyeahspaceshuttle:

Atlantis “Floats” Over the Earth

Backdropped by a colorful Earth, space shuttle Atlantis is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 23 crew member as the shuttle approaches the International Space Station during STS-132 rendezvous and docking operations. 

Tenerife in the Canary Island chain is visible below. 

(link)

Reblogged from fuckyeahspaceshuttle  80 notes

Space shuttle Atlantis is pictured on Launch Pad 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida following the move of the rotating service structure (RSS). The structure provides weather protection and access to the shuttle while it awaits liftoff on the pad. RSS “rollback” marks a major milestone in Atlantis’ STS-135 mission countdown. Liftoff was at 11:29 a.m. (EDT) on July 8, 2011. Onboard are NASA astronauts Chris Ferguson, commander; Doug Hurley, pilot; Sandy Magnus and Rex Walheim, both mission specialists. STS-135 will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts for the space station. Atlantis also carries the Robotic Refueling Mission experiment that will investigate the potential for robotically refueling existing satellites in orbit. In addition, Atlantis will return with a failed ammonia pump module to help NASA better understand the failure mechanism and improve pump designs for future systems. STS-135 will be the 33rd flight of Atlantis, the 37th shuttle mission to the space station, and the 135th and final mission of NASA’s Space Shuttle Program. Photo credit: NASA
(link)


Interesting perspective. I’ve never seen a photo from here before.

Space shuttle Atlantis is pictured on Launch Pad 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida following the move of the rotating service structure (RSS). The structure provides weather protection and access to the shuttle while it awaits liftoff on the pad. RSS “rollback” marks a major milestone in Atlantis’ STS-135 mission countdown. Liftoff was at 11:29 a.m. (EDT) on July 8, 2011. Onboard are NASA astronauts Chris Ferguson, commander; Doug Hurley, pilot; Sandy Magnus and Rex Walheim, both mission specialists. STS-135 will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts for the space station. Atlantis also carries the Robotic Refueling Mission experiment that will investigate the potential for robotically refueling existing satellites in orbit. In addition, Atlantis will return with a failed ammonia pump module to help NASA better understand the failure mechanism and improve pump designs for future systems. STS-135 will be the 33rd flight of Atlantis, the 37th shuttle mission to the space station, and the 135th and final mission of NASA’s Space Shuttle Program. Photo credit: NASA

(link)

Interesting perspective. I’ve never seen a photo from here before.